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Grantsmanship for the GENIUS

$39.95

Goodwin Deacon, a master grantwriter, and Ken Ristine, a senior program officer with decades of experience, have teamed up to take us into the mind of the grantmaker and provide a step-by-step guide to crafting a proposal that is simply irresistible. Grantsmanship for the GENIUS gives us an insider’s perspective that will quickly put us miles ahead of the game.

For the GENIUS Press (2016) | 348 Pages

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SKU: 978-1-941050-34-7 Category: Tags: ,

Description

Grantsmanship for the GENIUS gives you a rare insider’s view into the perspective of the funder—whether a foundation, corporate donor, or government agency.

Besides being veterans in the grantsmanship field, the authors are experienced teachers of the subject. Tapping into their years of classroom experience, mentoring to their professional peers, and consulting for innumerable nonprofit organizations, they have mastered the fun, conversational style common to all For the GENIUS® books. In other words, they know how to explain even murky concepts so they are easily grasped. They provide plenty of examples and tips throughout and even have a bit of fun with their “Pure Genius!” and other sidebars.

Becoming a skilled and accomplished grant professional takes years of experience. But let’s face it—in the real world, we don’t have years to gain competency. We have to get started quickly, and we have to get started on the right foot. Even so, as we grow in experience we also need an authoritative guide to help us broaden and deepen our skills and to fill in the inevitable gaps. Therein lies another remarkable contribution of Grantsmanship for the GENIUS: The authors have organized this book to give us both a quick start and a full treatment of the subject.

Just to underscore the depths to which the authors take us, they cover such concepts as logic models and theory of change, often difficult for grantwriters to understand—especially those new to the field. The book explains such concepts in simple language and makes even formal terms less intimidating.

Table of Contents

Part 1—Quick-Start Letter

Chapter 1—Planning the Letter
Chapter 2—Let’s Write!

Part 2—Laying the Groundwork

Chapter 3—What Are Grants and What Can They Do?
Chapter 4—What Kinds of Funders Are There?
Chapter 5—Why Do Funders Make Grants?
Chapter 6—Types of Grants: What Makes a Fundable Project?
Chapter 7—Grants and Your Organization’s Budget

Part 3—Getting Ready

Chapter 8—Getting Your Organization Ready to Write Grants
Chapter 9—Researching Funding Sources
Chapter 10—Increasing Your Chances of Success
Chapter 11—Approaching Funders

Part 4—Writing: The First Stage

Chapter 12—Preparing to Write
Chapter 13—Getting Your Message Across
Chapter 14—Letters of Inquiry, Part 1
Chapter 15—Letters of Inquiry, Part 2

Part 5—Writing a Full Proposal

Chapter 16—Cover Letters, Cover Sheets, Proposal Outlines, and Summaries
Chapter 17—Logic Models
Chapter 18—Needs Statements
Chapter 19—Goals and Objectives
Chapter 20—Project Plans
Chapter 21—Evaluation Plans
Chapter 22—Project Budgets
Chapter 23—Organizational Information
Chapter 24—Sustainability

Part 6—What Comes Next?

Chapter 25—Meeting with Funders: Site Visits
Chapter 26—Acknowledgment and Stewardship

Appendix A—Model LOI
Appendix B—Sample Grant Proposal for SCUM
Appendix C—Code of Ethics of Grant Professionals Association
Appendix D—Chicago Area Common Grant Application

Summary of Chapters

Part 1—Quick-Start Letter

This section will show you how to write a short letter to a funder requesting a grant. This way you can get off the ground running, and then get into more detail later on.

Chapter 1—Planning the Letter
Most funders screen requests through letters or online applications. The Quick-Start Letter will help you create a draft that will help you with either approach.

Chapter 2—Let’s Write!
It’s important to catch a funder’s attention, but you also have to be concise. Having the right information on hand can help you do both.

Part 2—Laying the Groundwork

Learning about the world of grants will help you become a better grantwriter. It’s especially important to understand funders’ motivations for giving.

Chapter 3—What Are Grants and What Can They Do?
Most people have heard of grants, yet few understand all the intricacies of getting them. This chapter will outline some of the basics that will help you understand the other topics in this book.

Chapter 4—What Kinds of Funders Are There?
From private foundations and corporate giving programs to government agencies, there is a wide variety of sources for grants. Each type of funder has its own approach that you need to understand.

Chapter 5—Why Do Funders Make Grants?
Funders don’t make grants just because they have money. When you understand a funder’s motivation, you can form a relationship that may result in a first grant and others in the future.

Chapter 6—Types of Grants: What Makes a Fundable Project?
There are three main types of grants: capital, program, and organizational. If you understand why a funder requests each type, you can craft a better proposal.

Chapter 7—Grants and Your Organization’s Budget
The amount of money distributed in all grants, including large foundations, composes only a small portion of nonprofit revenues. Successful organizations understand how grants fit into the overall revenue picture.

Part 3—Getting Ready

To be successful, you need to make sure there’s a good match between your organization and the funders you approach. It’s also important to develop a relationship with grantmakers.

Chapter 8—Getting Your Organization Ready to Write Grants
Nonprofits need to have several elements in place before they’re ready to write successful grants. We’ll go over the infrastructure you need and how to get your first dollars.

Chapter 9—Researching Funding Sources
It’s worth using paid subscription databases to narrow down the most promising foundation prospects, including private, public, and corporate foundations. Corporations that give directly rather than through foundations require different resources. We’ll also discuss how to research government grants.

Chapter 10—Increasing Your Chances of Success
Proposals need to be tailored to the interests and requirements of each funder; sending out the same letter to dozens of funders rarely works. It’s important to work with your bosses and coworkers to gather important information about the work of your organization and to help them understand what you do.

Chapter 11—Approaching Funders
A solid grants program involves meeting funders before you submit a proposal. There are ways to develop a relationship with them that will increase your chances of success.

Part 4—Writing: The First Stage

Here we talk about screening tests and gathering the material you’ll need to write. We have some writing tips for you, and then we discuss how to write a compelling letter of inquiry.

Chapter 12—Preparing to Write
Before you can begin writing the proposal, you may need to pass a screening test. Be sure you’re aware of final submission requirements. Determine what information you’ll need to gather from other people, and get them started on these tasks in plenty of time.

Chapter 13—Getting Your Message Across
Skilled grantwriters are aware of their audience and write with a minimum of jargon. Format your proposals so as to make them easily readable.

Chapter 14—Letters of Inquiry, Part 1
Letters are the preferred initial contact for a great number of funders. They are also a tool that can help you when completing an online screening form or online application.

Chapter 15—Letters of Inquiry, Part 2
Budgets can seem scary, but they’re really quite manageable if you take them one step at a time. We discuss how much to ask for, and what comes after the letter of inquiry.

Part 5—Writing a Full Proposal

This section goes into detail about each section of a standard grant proposal. We’ll help you understand what funders are looking for.

Chapter 16—Cover Letters, Cover Sheets, Proposal Outlines, and Summaries
Cover letters give you the opportunity to introduce your proposal to funders in your own format. Many funders ask applicants to complete fill-in-the-blank cover sheets as well. A proposal outline will give you an overview of the narrative. Summaries or abstracts are the first section of the proposal narrative—they’re crucial for making a good first impression.

Chapter 17—Logic Models
Logic models are charts that some funders ask grantseekers to complete to map out their projects. They are also a way that you can evaluate your own project planning.

Chapter 18—Needs Statements
Compelling grant requests address important community needs. Your needs statement can address both a community situation and a funder’s reasons for making grants.

Chapter 19—Goals and Objectives
Goals and objectives are ways of connecting your work to your mission. Writing them the right way is critical to your grant success.

Chapter 20—Project Plans
This is where you describe the details of how you plan to carry out your project: the who, how, where, and when. You’ll lay out your strategy for reaching your goals.

Chapter 21—Evaluation Plans
Just as goals and objectives state your criteria for success, your evaluation plans state how you will measure that success. They are the mirror image of your goals and objectives. It’s important to state how you plan to evaluate both the work you will have done and the impact of that work.

Chapter 22—Project Budgets
A budget plan tells funders what resources you need to carry out your project. It also provides a way for you to describe how you’ll gather those resources.

Chapter 23—Organizational Information
Your nonprofit’s background explains who the applicant is and establishes its credibility as an organization capable of carrying out the grant project. Most grants require several standard attachments—gather them early in the grantwriting process and keep them updated.

Chapter 24—Sustainability
Grants are often one-time investments in grantees. Knowing that your organization can sustain itself tells a funder that its investment will have an impact for years to come.

Part 6—What Comes Next?

After you submit your proposal, a funder may ask for a site visit. When you finally get an answer to your request, there is important follow-up to do, especially if you receive a grant, but even if you don’t.

Chapter 25—Meeting with Funders: Site Visits
Many funders meet face-to-face with potential grantees as a part of their review process, usually at your site of operations. Understanding what a funder wants to accomplish with these meetings can help you get the most out of them.

Chapter 26—Acknowledgment and Stewardship
How you manage your grant can be a key to receiving your next one. Acknowledging a grant and taking care to report on your use of the money can help you build your relationships with funders.

Appendix A—Model LOI

Appendix B—Sample Grant Proposal for SCUM

Appendix C—Code of Ethics of Grant Professionals Association

Appendix D—Chicago Area Common Grant Application

About Goodwin Deacon

Goodwin Deacon, coauthor of Grantsmanship for the GENIUS

Goodwin Deacon, PhD

Goodwin Deacon earned a PhD in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and began her career as an English professor at the Universities of Utah and Idaho. In 1980 she moved to Seattle and began a second career as a grantwriter, working for Seattle Opera, Seattle University, Children’s Hospital Foundation, and later Edmonds Community College. At the same time, she continued teaching humanities at Antioch University Seattle, including writing classes.

In 1992 she became a consultant, offering grantwriting and prospect research services through her business, Deacon Consulting. She has worked with a wide variety of nonprofit organizations in the Puget Sound region in the fields of the arts, education, healthcare, social services, and the environment.

In 1990, Goodwin founded the Puget Sound Grantwriters Association, a networking and training organization that helps grantwriters improve their skills, meet funders, and form a community with each other. She has also taught grantwriting at Discover U., the University of Washington Fundraising Management Program, and Antioch University Seattle. She is a frequent speaker on panels and at conferences, and offers workshops on grantwriting and research. Goodwin continues to serve on the board of the Puget Sound Grantwriters Association.

About Ken Ristine

Ken Ristine, coauthor of Grantsmanship for the GENIUS

Ken Ristine

Ken Ristine has worked in the nonprofit sector since 1977, though his experience working with people and understanding financial systems began with several jobs he held during college. He began honing his writing skills as a ghostwriter for a ghostwriter.

After college, he worked as a research analyst for a nonprofit alcoholism program on labor/management agreements that were precursors of employee assistance programs. He moved on to United Way, first with fundraising and later in the community affairs division.

In 1984, he became the planning, allocations, and community affairs director for another United Way. Five years later, he joined the staff of a private family foundation where he is now the senior program officer. Throughout his career in nonprofits, he’s consulted with dozens of nonprofits on program design and implementation, fundraising, proposal development, nonprofit tax issues, and organizational development. Ken is a frequent speaker at conferences and classes on nonprofit work.